flies in a compost container

Flies Are Your Compost Pile’s Worst Enemy. Here’s How To Defeat Them.

If you have been composting for a while, you may have noticed that flies seem to love your pile of organic matter. While they may not be the most aesthetically pleasing part of composting, some flies actually serve an important role in the process.

However, there are ways to get rid of flies in compost if they become a nuisance. In this blog post, we will discuss the types of flies that live in compost piles, reasons why flies congregate in and around your compost, as well as some fixes and troubleshooting tips!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I make a small commission on products purchased through these links at no extra cost to you.

TYPES OF FLIES THAT LIVE IN COMPOST

FRUIT FLY

The most common type of fly that is attracted to compost piles is the fruit fly. These small, light-colored flies are drawn to rotting fruits and vegetables, as well as other organic matter. You may have seen them hovering around your sink or garbage can. If you have a kitchen counter compost bin or a worm bin, you’re likely to have a run-in with fruit flies at some point.

HOUSEFLY

Houseflies are another common type of fly that is attracted to compost. They are larger than fruit flies, and their body is black with light-colored stripes on the thorax. Houseflies feed on decaying organic matter, as well as food residue and excrement. They can be a nuisance in homes and businesses, and they can also spread disease, so it’s important to get rid of them if they become a problem.

BLACK SOLDIER FLIES

Black soldier flies are not as common as fruit flies or houseflies, but they can also be drawn to compost piles. These flies are about an inch long, and their body is black with a metallic sheen. Black soldier fly larvae can actually help break down organic matter in the compost pile, so they aren’t always considered pests. However, they can become a nuisance if they are in high numbers.

WHY FLIES ARE ATTRACTED TO COMPOST

There are several reasons why you may see flies congregating around your compost pile. Here are some of the most common ones:

THE COMPOST IS A PERFECT BREEDING ENVIRONMENT

Flies love nesting sites that are dark, moist, and warm. The compost pile provides all of these things, so it’s a perfect place for them to lay their eggs.

LOTS OF “GREEN” MATERIAL

Rotting fruits and vegetables are a major attractant for fruit flies and other types of flies. They love the smell of decomposing matter, so if you have a lot of green material in your compost pile, you’re likely to see more flies.

TROUBLESHOOTING FLIES IN COMPOST

If you’re having trouble getting rid of flies in your compost pile, here are a few tips:

ADD RED CHILI POWDER TO YOUR COMPOST TO DETER FLIES

One way to prevent flies from making a home in your compost is by adding a few tablespoons of red chili powder into your bin or pile and mixing it up thoroughly. The chili powder will create an unpleasant environment for flies, deterring them from nesting in your compost. The chili powder will also act as a natural pesticide, killing any fly larvae that may be present.

If you are already dealing with an infestation of flies in your compost, adding red chili powder may not be enough to get rid of them all. In this case, you can take additional measures to eradicate the pests.

BURY FOOD SCRAPS

Flies love nothing more than a big pile of kitchen scraps to lay their eggs in. But they won’t go to the trouble of burrowing down underneath layers of other materials to get to the scraps. Burying food scraps under a layer of carbon-rich materials like leaves, straw, or paper will disguise the smell of the rotting scraps, make it less inviting for flies, as well as make it difficult for them to access the waste than they prefer.

BALANCE THE PH

Hungry fruit flies enjoy an acidic environment, so if you’ve been adding too much citrus or other low PH foods, that will definitely attract them. If that’s the case, make sure to add some high PH materials like coffee grounds or eggshells to balance out the PH and discourage the flies from making a home.

Also, make sure that your compost bin is tightly sealed. If there are any cracks or openings, the flies will be able to get in and lay their eggs.

If you’re still having problems with flies in your compost, try adding a layer of flypaper or some other sticky surface near the top of the bin. The flies will land on it and

UTILIZE YOUR HOUSEHOLD VACUUM

If you’re already dealing with an indoor fruit fly infestation, you can temporarily get rid of the flies flying around by using a vacuum wand to vacuum them out of the air. This should take care of the majority of the adult flies until more eggs start to hatch the larvae grow into adults. And so, the problem begins again.

MAKE A FRUIT FLY TRAP

There are a few different ways to make a DIY fruit fly trap.

One way is to take a jar and fill it with half apple cider vinegar and half water. then, add a drop of dish soap to the mixture. Then, take a piece of paper and make a funnel with it. Tape the funnel to the inside of the jar lid and make sure that the smaller end of the funnel is facing down. The flies will be attracted to the vinegar and fly into the jar, but they won’t be able to find the hole in the funnel to be able to escape.

Another way is to put some overripe fruit in a bowl and cover it with plastic wrap. Poke a few holes in the top of the plastic wrap, and the flies will crawl in but won’t be able to get out.

FREEZE KITCHEN SCRAPS

If you’re struggling with flies being attracted to your countertop compost container, you can try freezing your kitchen scraps. The cold temperature will kill any flies already living within the scraps and will prevent any new flies from laying eggs.

As a bonus for vermicomposters, frozen scraps are easier for worms to digest, so you’ll get finished compost even faster!

KEEP YOUR COMPOST FAR AWAY

If you have an outdoor compost pile, try keeping your compost bin as far away from the house as possible. The further the flies have to travel, the less likely they are to make it inside your home and become a nuisance.

A good rule of thumb is to keep your compost bin at least 20 feet away from any entrances to your home.

COMPOSTING WITHOUT FLIES IS POSSIBLE

Flies in compost can be a nuisance, but there are ways to get rid of them. By understanding the reasons for flies in compost and taking corrective measures, you can keep your compost pile healthy – and free of flies!

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *